The nicely finished black chassis measures 225mm x 200mm x 44mm and offers six USB connections, HDMI output, Ethernet, headphone and mic sockets, VGA output as well as Bluetooth and WiFi which can be disabled. As I am no fan of having a component broadcasting high-frequency electronic noise in close proximity of my system, I stuck to Ethernet. Disabling wireless features has consistently offered real improvements in sound quality with any computer or server type product I have used. Note that Keetakawee recommends connecting your DAC's USB cable to the top USB 2.0 connector on the rear of the Nimitra. He also recommends not connecting a USB storage device to the USB 3 connector directly below. I'm guessing both devices share the same USB bus, therefore separating the two makes sense. The front panel sports a centre mounted power up/off button. Boot up time is roughly 30 seconds.


A key design feature of the Nimitra is noise reduction. According to Keetakawee, one of the best ways to reduce electrical noise is to use low-power components rather than shoe-horn aftermarket filters and isolators that perhaps do more harm than good. Therefore, his processor is one of Intel's low-power models. There are no moving parts such as spinning hard drives or cooling fans. The hard drive is solid-state and only contains the OS and various music-related programs. The chassis and footers also assist in reducing resonance issues. The power supply is off-board.


Specifications are:
CPU: Intel Celeron J1900 Quad Core 2.0GHz
Memory: 4GB DDR3L
USB: 5 x USB 2.0 / 1 x USB 3.0
Connectivity: LAN / WiFi / Bluetooth / HDMI / VGA
Supported formats*: AAC, AIF, AIFC, AIFF, APE, ASF, ASX, BWF, CDA, DFF, DSF, FLAC, M2A, M4A, M4B, MP+, MP1, MP2, MP3, MP4, MPA, MPC, MPEG, MPG, MPGA, MPP, MPX, OGA, OGG, RADIO, W64, WASAPI, WAV, WMA, WMV, WV, WVX
Power input: 12VDC with 2.5mm DC jack
Power supply: 12V 5A switching 100-240V 50/60Hz (PSU upgrade is coming soon)
Dimension: 225(W) x 44(H) x 200(D) mm
Weight: 2kg
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* for streaming from built-in Asset UPnP library server with DSD64 support. JPLAY Streamer accepts only WAV and TIDAL streaming.


While the Nimitra does not require a monitor, mouse or keyboard, you'll probably want to keep them on hand if you wish to install other library management/playback software such as minimserver, Foobar or JRiver Media Center. I eventually installed JRMC as I prefer its feature set and flexibility over that of Asset. Also, some folks may want to adjust some of JPlay Streamer's parameters from their defaults although Keetakawee stressed that he had selected what he thought were the optimum settings for the Nimitra. Asset UPnP Server supports pretty much any format available including all the popular ones like AIFF, DFF, DSF, FLAC, MP3 and WAV. As JPlay Streamer only accepts WAV and Tidal streaming, Asset transcodes all supported formats to WAV files (or DoP for DSD). Note that Asset currently only supports DSD64 which was another reason I mostly used JRMC even though I can literately count the DSD128 albums I have on one hand. For me it was no deal breaker as I do not have a preference for DSD or high-resolution PCM. Some folks go gaga over one format or the other but to my ears it's just a case of apples versus oranges. Regarding transcoding FLAC files to WAV, for whatever reason regardless the platform or software be it Asset, JRMC or minimserver; this process has consistently provided a notable uptick in sound quality. If the playback software you currently use offers on-the-fly transcoding, give it a try.